13 Useful Tips for Visiting the Alamo in San Antonio

As the most famous building in Texas, it’s safe to say that visiting the Alamo in San Antonio is a right of passage for Texans, as well as an extremely popular attraction for visitors.

Even if you have never laid eyes on the famous mission (or what’s left of it, anyway), odds are that you have heard the battle cry “Remember the Alamo!” associated with Texas.

Like so many people who lived within driving distance at the time, my first visit to the Alamo took place on a 4th grade Texas history field trip.

I’ve visited several times as an adult since, most of them while living in San Antonio.

Here’s what to know about visiting the Alamo in Texas–plus what exactly it is in the first place!

front doors of the alamo shrine, pre booking tickets is an essential tips for visiting the alamo texas

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A (Very) Brief History of the Alamo in Texas

Exploring the history of the Alamo in detail is an extremely complex topic–and, as you might imagine, the legend of the Alamo as explored in movies, shows, and art throughout Texas leaves an enormous amount of nuance and downright fact out of the story.

Without getting too into the weeds (there’s plenty of time for that when you visit the Alamo, though this article is a good primer), here are the basics of how the Alamo became such a cultural symbol in Texas.

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The Alamo–then known as Mission San Antonio de Valero–was first established by Franciscan monks in 1718 for the explicit purpose of converting local Native people to Catholicism.

In 1793, the mission was secularized and became a town, Pueblo de Valero.

After the Mexican War of Independence (1810-1821), the Alamo was occupied by the Mexican army.

The front facade of the Alamo in San Antonio Texas as seen from the ridge side of the building

When Mexico won independence, many Anglo-American settlers were invited into Texas, with the explicit stipulation that they follow Mexican law. Many came; few wanted to be ruled by Mexico.

In February 1836, roughly 200 people defended the Alamo in the name of an independent Texas against 5,000 soldiers for the Mexican army, led by General Santa Anna.

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187 men–among them Texas legends such as Davy Crockett, William B. Travis, and James Bowie–perished defending the Alamo (though it’s worth noting that how, exactly, they lost their lives probably doesn’t live up to the legend).

A month later, further south, General Sam Houston and his army fought the decisive Battle of San Jacinto, shouting “Remember the Alamo!” as they did.

The Battle of San Jacinto led to the capture of General Santa Anna, and the formation of the Republic of Texas.

close up of alamo cenotaph memorial in front of the alamo san antonio

Essential Tips for Visiting the Alamo, San Antonio

Schedule your timed entry in advance.

Touring the Alamo is free, however, touring the church itself (also called the shrine) requires a pre-booked timed entry slot.

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This is done to reduce crowds and definitely improves the experience.

I vividly remember standing in a very long, very hot, line before this system was put in place, though the line area is at least shaded.

However, it does mean that an Alamo tour requires a bit of advance planning these days.

view of san antonio texas alamo from across the street

… and book an early time slot if you can.

… you know, at least for the vast majority of the year when it’s hot in San Antonio!

Luckily the church is air-conditioned, but the bulk of your visit to the Alamo will be spent outside.

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Expect a small building.

One of the most common comments made by people visiting the Alamo for the first time is simply, “It’s so small!”.

And it’s true. 

Much of the land that once made up the Alamo has been absorbed by San Antonio, leaving only the church and a small surrounding area to observe today.

Add in the fact that the tiny stone church is dwarfed by the modern buildings that surround it, and it’s safe to say that the Alamo isn’t overwhelming in appearance these days!

aerial view of visiting the alamo texas

… But the shrine isn’t all there is to see.

From cannons to gardens to live historical re-enactors, there is lots to see at the Alamo, even if the site is fairly compact in size.

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No photos are allowed inside the church.

The grounds, however, are fair game!

walled gardens alamo with large live oak tree shading the area

Keep an eye out for Bella.

Beautiful Bella is the current official Alamo cat–yes, there is such a thing!

You just might see her roaming the grounds while visiting the Alamo, so be sure to keep an eye out for her.

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Be sure to stop by the gift shop.

In addition to shopping for potential San Antonio souvenirs, this is also where you’ll find a very impressive diorama showing the Alamo as it once functioned.

It’s an excellent way to put a visual to the history of the Alamo.

bell hanging over the ornate door of the gift shop, visit the alamo san antonio texas

Don’t only visit the Alamo.

The Alamo is one of only five historic Spanish missions in San Antonio, and while the Alamo is certainly the most famous, it’s not necessarily the most impressive!

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Housed in the center of town, much of the land that once made up the Alamo has been consumed by San Antonio, leaving a fairly small park in its place.

In some of the other missions, however, the overall picture of the mission itself is still much more apparent.

front facade of mission concepcion san antonio

FAQ for Visiting the Alamo in San Antonio, TX

How much does it cost to visit the Alamo?

The Alamo is absolutely free to visit!

Just be sure to pre-book your entry time to guarantee that you can tour the church.

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Where is the Alamo in San Antonio?

The Alamo is located in downtown San Antonio, TX, less than a 5-minute walk from the River Walk.

Today, it’s surrounded by modern buildings and tourist attractions, giving the (accurate) impression that the city literally grew up around it.

view of the buildings across the street from the alamo tips for visiting

What else can you do near the Alamo in Texas?

Thanks to its central location, you can find many of the best things to do in San Antonio near the Alamo–many of them within walking distance!

The River Walk, La Villita, the San Fernando Cathedral, and the Briscoe Western Art Museum are all located within a 15-minute walk of the Alamo, just to name a few.

Kid-friendly (and importantly, air-conditioned) spots such as Ripley’s Believe it or Not! and Legoland are also very close to the Alamo.

curve in the san antonio riverwalk with a bridge in the distance

Is the Alamo a UNESCO World Heritage Site?

Yes, it is!

The San Antonio Missions, encompassing all five historic Spanish missions in the city, are collectively recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

front facade of the alamo on a sunny day, tips for visiting the alamo tx

What about the other San Antonio Missions?

The other 4 missions in San Antonio are Mission Concepción, Mission San José, Mission Espada, and Mission San Juan Capistrano, and each and every one of them is well worth visiting.

Like the Alamo, a visit to the San Antonio Missions today primarily means visiting the remains of the churches, though the spaces were initially much larger.

However, you can get much more of a feel for the 18th-century history of the missions at the non-Alamo properties.

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Mission San José was partially rebuilt during the 1930s and gives the best example of the size of a Spanish mission in the 18th century.

The missions are all connected to each other via a hiking and biking trail and each is located roughly 2.5 miles from the next.

If the weather is not too hot, renting bikes to travel between the missions is a fun way to explore San Antonio (if the weather is unpleasantly hot, you may prefer to drive between some of the missions).

If you want to visit these missions without worrying about transportation and with a guide, this guided tour is a great option!

Book your tour of these San Antonio missions today!

view of the cathedral of mission san jose as seen through a stone window

How long does it take to visit the Alamo?

As long as you like!

If you take the audio tour and peruse all of the exhibits, you can easily spend a couple of hours making your way through all the things to do at the Alamo.

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On the flip side, if you have limited time in San Antonio and only want to take a look at the front facade of the famous church, you can visit the Alamo in just 5 minutes.

An average Alamo tour tends to fall somewhere between those two extremes.

photo of the front facade of the alamo texas, red and black text on a white background reads "the alamo travel tips"

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